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UCS Publications | Global Security

 

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UCS reports are available online. For print copies of *select* books and other items, see our online store, or complete this order form and send it to UCS Publications, 2 Brattle Sq., Cambridge, MA 02138-3780 (or fax it to 617-864-9405). For orders under $50, add 20% for shipping & handling; over $50, add 10%. UCS members are entitled to a 20% discount on all prices listed.

Making Smart Security Choices: The Future of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Complex

This 2013 report takes a big picture look at the U.S. nuclear weapons program and recommends cost-effective changes to improve U.S. security. Its findings? The U.S. is planning to spend $60 billion dollars on new nuclear warheads and facilities—but isn't prioritizing maintenance, dismantlement, or research.

By Lisbeth Gronlund, Eryn MacDonald, Stephen Young, Philip E. Coyle III, Steve Fetter. UCS, 2013. 84 pp.

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A History of Anti-Satellite Programs

More than 950 operating satellites currently orbit the Earth, providing information and other services essential to our civilian, scientific, and economic life, as well as our military operations. As their importance increases, so do concerns about keeping them safe. A History of Anti-Satellite Programs describes the major motivations and milestones in the development of anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons, from the years of the first satellites to the present day.

By Laura Grego. UCS, 2012. 16 pp.

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Securing The Skies: Ten Steps the United States Should Take to Improve the Security and Sustainability of Space

The United States has a vital interest in ensuring the sustainability of the space environment, keeping satellites safe and secure, and enhancing stability not only in space but also on the ground. The United States cannot address these space-related issues on its own, but its international leadership is essential.

This report recommends 10 practical near-term steps that the United States should take to protect its own assets and to move the world toward a more secure and sustainable future in space.

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Toward True Security: Ten Steps the Next President Should Take to Transform U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy

To prevent more nations—and eventually terrorists—from acquiring nuclear weapons, the United States should drastically reduce the role that nuclear weapons play in its security policies. Toward True Security outlines 10 steps the next president should take to transform U.S. nuclear policy.

UCS, 2008. 31 pp.

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The Physics of Space Security: A Reference Manual

This AAAS report (written by UCS scientists) discusses the technical requirements for launching and maneuvering weapons in space and assesses the vulnerability of satellite components to interference or destruction. Its analysis provides the facts needed to make an informed evaluation of space policy choices.

By David Wright, Laura Grego, and Lisbeth Gronlund. American Academy of Arts & Sciences, 2005. 177 pp.

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Technical Realities: An Analysis of the 2004 Deployment of a U.S. National Missile Defense System

This report shows that the planned deployment of the U.S. national missile defense will provide no real protection in an actual attack due to the lack of realistic testing.

By Lisbeth Gronlund, David Wright, George Lewis, Philip Coyle III. UCS, 2004. 76 pp.

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Countermeasures: A Technical Evaluation of the Operational Effectiveness of the Planned US National Missile Defense System

A detailed analysis of how the proposed national missile defense system could be defeated by missiles equipped with simple countermeasures. Demonstrates that any state technically capable of constructing missiles would also be able to construct effective countermeasures.

By Andrew M. Sessler et al. UCS, 2000. 200 pp.

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