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UCS Publications | Nuclear Power

 

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UCS reports are available online. For print copies of *select* books and other items, see our online store, or complete this order form and send it to UCS Publications, 2 Brattle Sq., Cambridge, MA 02138-3780 (or fax it to 617-864-9405). For orders under $50, add 20% for shipping & handling; over $50, add 10%. UCS members are entitled to a 20% discount on all prices listed.

Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster

Written by nuclear experts in compulsively readable detail, this book takes a moment-by-moment look at what went wrong at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant. Using firsthand accounts, technical records, and media coverage, the book explores why Fukushima happened—and what it means for U.S. nuclear safety.

By Dave Lochbaum, Edwin Lyman, and Susan Q. Stranahan. The New Press, February 2014.

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The NRC and Nuclear Power Plant Safety in 2013: More Jekyll, Less Hyde

2013 was a mixed year for the NRC. Several incidents showed the NRC can be an effective regulator, but inconsistent enforcement and several near-misses means there’s more to be done.

By Dave Lochbaum. UCS, March 2014. 60 pp.

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Small Modular Reactors: Safety, Security, and Cost Concerns

SMRs are touted as both safer and more cost-effective than older, larger nuclear reactor designs—but are these claims really justified? Our analysis suggests that SMRs aren't cost effective and come with significant safety and security concerns.

By Edwin Lyman. UCS, September 2013. 24 pp.

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NRC’s Failure to Enforce Reactor Fire Regulations

Fire poses significant risk to nuclear power plant safety—but the government agency tasked with nuclear safety is failing to enforce fire regulations.

By David Lochbaum. UCS, June 2013. 6 pp.

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The NRC and Nuclear Power Safety in 2012: Tolerating the Intolerable

In our third annual assessment, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the federal agency responsible for ensuring that U.S. nuclear plants are operated as safely as possible, is taken to task for a poor safety culture that puts the public at unnecessary risk. The report examines 14 “near-misses” at U.S. nuclear plants during 2012 and evaluates the NRC response in each case.

By David Lochbaum. UCS, 2013. 54 pp.

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U.S. Nuclear Power Safety One Year After Fukushima

The Fukushima nuclear plant disaster of March 2011 cast a long shadow over U.S. nuclear power policy. A year later, what have we learned, and how well are we putting those lessons into practice?

By David Lochbaum and Edwin Lyman. UCS, 2012. 54 pp.

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The NRC and Nuclear Power Safety in 2011: Living on Borrowed Time

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the federal agency responsible for ensuring that U.S. nuclear plants are operated as safely as possible, gets mixed reviews again in our second annual assessment of NRC response to safety problems. The report examines 15 “near-misses” at U.S. nuclear plants during 2011 and evaluates the NRC response in each case.

By David Lochbaum. UCS, 2012. 54 pp.

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Big Risks, Better Alternatives: An Examination of Two Nuclear Energy Projects in the U.S.

According to this 2011 report, two new nuclear power projects—a new power plant near Gainesville, FL, and an expansion of the Alvin W. Vogtle plant in Burke County, GA—expose taxpayers and ratepayers to costs and risks that are both excessive and unnecessary, because safer, more cost-efficient energy choices are available.

By Max Chang et al. Synapse Energy Economics/UCS, 2011. 53 pp.

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U.S. Nuclear Power after Fukushima: Common Sense Recommendations for Safety and Security

The United States must take concrete steps now to address serious shortcomings in nuclear plant safety and security that have been evident for years. Toward this end, UCS nuclear power experts have put together a list of 23 recommendations that could significantly improve our ability to prevent or mitigate the impact of accidents and terrorist attacks at nuclear power plants.

UCS, 2011. 12 pp.

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The NRC and Nuclear Power Plant Safety in 2010: A Brighter Spotlight Needed

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission gets mixed reviews in The NRC and Nuclear Power Plant Safety in 2010. The report chronicles 14 "near-misses" at U.S. nuclear plants during 2010 and evaluates the NRC response in each case, showing that the agency is capable of acting effectively to protect the public, but too often doesn't.

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Nuclear Power: Still Not Viable without Subsidies

Government subsidies to the nuclear power industry over the past fifty years have been so large in proportion to the value of the energy produced that in some cases it would have cost taxpayers less to simply buy kilowatts on the open market and give them away. Nuclear Power: Still Not Viable without Subsidies looks at the economic impacts and policy implications of subsidies to the nuclear power industry—past, present, and proposed.

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Nuclear Power Loan Guarantees: Another Taxpayer Bailout Ahead?

With potentially 1.6 trillion dollars in risk exposure, both industry and Wall Street consider nuclear power plants too risky to finance. Our latest report urges Congress to be cautious about committing public funds to new nuclear plants, and identifies several critical steps the federal government must take before shifting the financial risks of new nuclear plant construction onto the taxpayer.

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Nuclear Power in a Warming World

Because nuclear energy results in few heat-trapping emissions, an expansion of the nuclear industry could help curtail global warming. But a new report by UCS shows that safety and security risks—including a massive release of radiation due to an accident or terrorist attack—would also accompany an expansion of nuclear power unless the industry, regulators, and Congress adopt reforms.

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Walking a Nuclear Tightrope: Unlearned Lessons of Year-plus Reactor Outages

This report identifies common themes among extended nuclear power reactor outages and outlines steps the Nuclear Regulatory Commission should take to avoid a catastrophic (and avoidable) nuclear accident.

By David Lochbaum. UCS, 2006. 39 pp.

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U.S. Nuclear Plants in the 21st Century: The Risk of a Lifetime

This report shows that aging U.S. nuclear power plants have an increased risk of serious accidents and that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission must adapt its regulatory regime to monitor plants at all points during their lifecycles.

By David Lochbaum. UCS, 2004. 27 pp.

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Nuclear Plant Risk Studies: Failing the Grade

Describes the flaws that riddle assessments of risk at nuclear power plants.

By David Lochbaum. UCS, 2000. 25 pp.

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The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: A Report on Safety in America's Nuclear Power Industry

An examination of safety margins at 10 representative nuclear power plants.

By David Lochbaum. UCS, 1998. 20 pp.

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