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Quotes From Prominent Scientist Signers

Each species on our planet plays a role in the healthy functioning of natural ecosystems, on which humans depend.
- William H. Schlesinger, Biogeochemist; Dean, Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences and James B. Duke Professor of Biogeochemistry, Duke University, North Carolina; member, National Academy of Sciences; and past president, Ecological Society of America


Biodiversity is our nation's natural wealth. The Endangered Species Act safeguards these riches. 
- Judy L. Meyer, Aquatic Ecologist, Research professor of Limnology, Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia; fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science; and past president, Ecological Society of America 

Biodiversity is the greatest treasure we have... Its diminishment is to be prevented at all cost.
- Thomas Eisner, Chemical Ecologist; Schurman Professor of Chemical Ecology and Director of the Cornell Institute for Research in Chemical Ecology (CIRCE), Cornell University, New York; member, National Academy of Sciences; and recipient, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement and the National Medal of Science.

We share this planet with many species. It is our responsibility to protect them, both for their sakes and our own.
- Pamela A. Matson, Ecologist, Dean, School of Earth Sciences and Goldman Professor of Environmental Studies, Stanford University, California; member, National Academy of Sciences; MacArthur Fellow; and past president, Ecological Society of America

The Endangered Species Act is scientifically sound and its goals are important to human well-being. We should improve its performance, not reduce its protections.
- Jane Lubchenco, Marine Ecologist, Valley Professor of Marine Biology and Distinguished Professor of Zoology, Oregon State University; member, National Academy of Sciences; MacArthur Fellow; past president, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Ecological Society of America, and International Council for Science

As children, small creatures endlessly fascinate us; as adults, we can protect them so as to inspire future children.
- Les E. Watling, Marine Ecologist, Professor of Biological Oceanography and former director, Darling Marine Center, University of Maine; Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation; and past president, Crustacean Society

Scientists know we must protect species because they are working parts of our life-support system.
- Paul Ehrlich, Entomologist, Population Biologist, Bing Professor of Population Studies and president, Center for Conservation Biology, Stanford University, California; member, National Academy of Sciences; MacArthur Fellow; and Crafoord Prize winner in Bioscience

For what DNA literacy if we have extinguished the books?
- Daniel H. Janzen, Evolutionary Ecologist, Professor of Biology, University of Pennsylvania; member, National Academy of Sciences; MacArthur Fellow; and Crafoord Prize winner in Bioscience

To weaken the scientific foundation of the Endangered Species Act is to doom more species to extinction.
-
Walter V. Reid, Ecologist, Consulting professor, Institute for the Environment, Stanford University, California; former director, Millennium Ecosystem Assessment; and past board member, Society for Conservation Biology

Once species become extinct, no corrective legislation can bring them back—they are gone forever.
- Allen M. Solomon, Paleoecologist, Senior research global ecologist, Environmental Protection Agency (retired); and former senior policy analyst, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

The Endangered Species Act is crucial to our nation's ecological health, and solid science is crucial to the ESA.
- Gary K. Meffe, Conservation Biologist, Professor of Conservation Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville; and editor, Conservation Biology

The Endangered Species Act has protected our natural heritage for 30 years; it must continue to do so.
- Stuart Pimm, Conservation Biologist, Doris Duke Chair of Conservation Ecology, Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, North Carolina; Pew Fellow in Conservation and the Environment; and LaRoe Prize winner for biodiversity protection

People can visit sacred shrines and imagine the spirits and the murmur of the voices of past generations. Likewise, we should go into natural places and imagine the spirits and murmurs of future generations hoping to experience the diversity of nature.
- Paul Dayton, Marine Ecologist, Professor of Oceanography, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California; Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation; and member, U.S. Marine Mammal Commission

Science is the foundation for preserving biodiversity to benefit all life on Earth.
- Jerry Schubel, Marine Biologist, President and CEO, Aquarium of the Pacific, Long Beach, California; former dean and director, SUNY at Stony Brook’s Marine Sciences Research Center; and board member, Census of Marine Life
 

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